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Fitting a new brake cable

When you pull your brakes on, you can haul the brake cable through the casing with all the strength in your fingers. However, when you release the brake lever, you’re relying on the strength of two small springs, one in each brake unit, to pull the units back out from the rim again.

If your cables are gritty, rusty or kinked, they won’t release freely, leaving you with sluggish, dragging brakes. When cutting new lengths of outer casing, check that each section is long enough; for example, the section that joins the handlebars to the frame should be long enough so that the bars can turn freely, without kinking the casing. The casing for the front brake should Replacing the brake cable

LINK WIRE

Fitting a new brake cable (1)

Pull the cable out of the outer casing a section at a time, leaving the casing in place for reference. Work out how the nipple on the end of the cable fits into the lever. As the nipple is attached to the lever make a smooth, graceful curve. Cut new lengths, neatly and squarely with good, sharp cutters. Don’t leave a ragged edge. If the lining gets squashed as you cut, prise it open with a sharp knife. Fit ferrules on each end of each section of casing. The final section of cable – connecting the cantilever units to the cable – is set up in two ways: a link wire or straddle hanger. Both are shown below.

STRADDLE HANGER

Fitting a new brake cable (2)

Step 1 : One brake unit has a cable clamp bolt, the opposite unit has a slot for the straddle wire nipple. Hold this unit so the brake block is pushed against the rim and pull nipple down and out to release it from the slot. Straddle wire and brake cable now hang loosely. Unhook straddle wire from straddle hanger, cut off cable end, undo clamp bolt and pull the cable out. If it’s frayed, replace it: cut off the cable end, undo the clamp bolt and pull it out of the unit.

Fitting a new brake cable (3)

Step 2 : Cut off the cable end on the old cable. Undo the cable pinch bolt that holds the straddle hanger onto the brake wire. You have to check what size tools you need, common sizes are 9mm and 10mm spanners, and 5mm Allen keys. Irritatingly, they often use two 10mm spanners – which is fine for workshops, which are usually awash with 10mm spanners, but may ask too much of a home toolbox.

Replacing the brake cable

Pull the cable out of the outer casing a section at a time, leaving the casing in place for reference. Work out how the nipple on the end of the cable fits into the lever. As the nipple is attached to the lever make a smooth, graceful curve. Cut new lengths, neatly and squarely with good, sharp cutters. Don’t leave a ragged edge. If the lining gets squashed as you cut, prise it open with a sharp knife. Fit ferrules on each end of each section of casing. The final section of cable – connecting the cantilever units to the cable – is set up in two ways: a link wire or straddle hanger. Both are shown below. blade, you usually need to pull the lever all the way in to see how it fits. Looking at the lever from below often helps. Undo the lockring on the brake lever barrel-adjuster until the slot on the adjuster lines up with the slot on the front of or underneath the lever body. Turn the adjuster to line up its slot.

The brake cable pulls out through the slot in the lever

Pull the old brake cable gently out of the slot, then pull the brake lever in toward the handlebar and wiggle the nipple out of its nest. You may have to pull the cable forward to line it up with an escape slot for the nipple. Remove each section of outer casing. The front brake has just a single section, but the rear may be in a couple of parts that are separated by an exposed section of cable across the top tube. Refit the sections on the frame or cable hanger.

Take your new cable and sit the nipple back in the nest on the lever, then back through the slots in the lever. Feed the cable back through each section of casing in turn. Drip a drop of oil onto parts of the cable that end up inside the outer casing.

Source : BIKE MAINTENANCE TIPS, TRICKS & TECHNIQUES