Home » Tag Archives:bike maintenance

Tag Archives: bike maintenance

Threaded headsets - servicing - Step 1

Threaded headsets: servicing

Headsets will thank you for regular servicing. Pick up the bike by the handlebar, and twist it – the bar should move freely, with no crunching noises. ...

Threaded headsets - adjusting bearings - Step 1

Threaded headsets: adjusting bearings

You need two spanners to adjust the bearings. The most common size, for 11/8-inch headsets, is 36 mm. Tou may also come across 1-inch headsets, which need a 32 mm spanner, and even the rare 11/2-inch headsets, which need a 40 mm spanner. The adjustable nut is quite narrow, so you will need a special narrow headset spanner. The top nut is wider, so use an adjustable spanner if you only have one headset spanner. ...

(A) Rear International Standard disc mounts

Disc brakes : fitting International Standard callipers to your bike

International Standard, or IS callipers are bolted to the bike using bolts which pass through the mounts on the frame or fork and then screw into the calliper, which is threaded. The horizontal alignment is adjusted with shims (thin washers) between the frame and the calliper. ...

Disc brakes - the ins and outs of axles

Disc brakes : the ins and outs of axles

Disc brakes are much more powerful than rim brakes and exert their forces in a different way. The braking force can remove any wheel that is not securely clamped within the frame or fork, with potentially lethal consequences. This is obviously something to be avoided at all costs! ...

Servicing calliper brake units (2)

Disc brakes : powerful and reliable braking on demand

Along with suspension systems, disc brakes have been the major source of innovation in bicycles over the last decade. They are now fitted as standard on mountain bikes, some hybrid bikes and, increasingly, cyclocross bikes. ...

Front calliper brake – Brompton folding bicycle

Servicing calliper brakes

Without mudguards, calliper brakes are right in the line of fire for anything your tyre picks up off the road. Dirt ends up on the pivots that hold your callipers together and stops them moving freely. This is one of those satisfying jobs that looks much harder than it is and makes your bike feel much better as soon as you’ve done it. ...

Calliper brakes - fitting cables (5)

New outer casing and bar tape

You may find when you’re replacing the brake inner cable that it feels gritty as you feed it through the first section of outer casing – this runs from the brakelever under the bar tape to the frame, in the case of the back brake, or directly to the front brake unit. If this is the case, you will need to peel back the bar tape and replace the outer casing as well as the inner cable. It’s an irritating job, but will make your brakes feel much crisper and more responsive. ...

Calliper brakes : fitting cables

Road bike brake blocks won’t be as sharp as V-brakes or disc brakes even when new, so make sure your cables are in good condition for the best possible braking. The back brake in particular has a long cable, and both cables are routed under the bar tape, so they’re forced around tight turns. Once the cables start to deteriorate, you’ll find that the levers become steadily harder to pull, and the brake blocks don’t spring easily back from the rims once you release the levers. Replacing the cab...

Calliper brakes - adjustment (6)

Calliper brakes : adjustment

Calliper brakes are found on road bikes. For best performance, these brakes must be adjusted so that your wheel will run cleanly between the blocks without touching either block. ...