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Tag Archives: sewing techniques

Tacking (Basting)

Tacking (Basting)

Tacking (basting) is a sewer's best insurance policy! If you want to make sure that your sewing is straight, particularly when stitching fiddly items together, it is a great idea to tack the pieces together before sewing with your machine. Tacking can also give you much greater control and accuracy than simply pinning your items together. ...

How to Sew A Lapped Zipper (4)

How to Sew A Lapped Zipper

How to Sew A Lapped Zipper is a type of zipper application in which one side overlaps the zipper. The zipper is positioned so that it hides under this overlap. The zipper is harder to see from the overlap side of the zipper and easier to see on the side without the overlap. Instead of a centered zipper, for which the zipper is in the middle of the opening, a lapped zipper has one wide side that covers the zipper and one narrow side underneath. Lapped zippers are inserted after the seam below the...

Centered zipper

How to Sew A Centered Zipper

A centered zipper is a type of zipper insertion in which the zipper teeth are centered between the fabric opening. In this type of zipper application, the fabric covers the zipper equally on both sides, meeting in the middle of the opening, and the stitching is visible on either side of the zipper opening. The zipper teeth may be visible as you move and the fabric layers pull apart, but when the garment is flat, the folded edges meet to completely cover the zipper. To insert a centered zipper, y...

How to Sew Spaghetti Straps (5)

How to Sew Spaghetti Straps

Spaghetti, or shoestring, straps are narrow straps made of fabric. The straps are made by sewing a tube, then turning the fabric right side out. The seam allowances fill up the tube to make a slightly rounded strap. For flatter straps, trim the seam allowance before turning or sew the straps slightly wider. ...

How to sew a french tack (6)

How to Sew A French Tack

A French tack is a thread chain that connects layers of fabric together loosely, usually at the hemline of a garment. The tack is made of regular sewing thread that’s hand crocheted to form the chain and attached between the garment and its lining. ...

Inside of flat-felled seam

How to Sew A Flat-Felled Seam

A flat-felled seam is a strong, topstitched seam where the raw edges are enclosed. It’s also referred to as a felled seam or a flat fell seam. A true flat-felled seam will be cleanly finished on both sides of the garment. You may also see mock flat-felled seams, which have the appearance of flat-felled seams but are less work to sew. For flat-felled seams, you can choose to have the fell on the right side of your garment, which will have two lines of stitching, or on the inside of your garment, ...

How to sew a cuff with placket (4)

How to Sew A Cuff with Placket

A cuff is a band of fabric used to finish the hemlines of sleeves or pant legs. Cuffs can be elasticized with a casing or interfaced and flat. Cuffs are often cut smaller than the opening, or they can be cut the same width as the sleeve or pant. Cuffs on tailored dress shirts are often sewn with a placket opening so the shirt can be released to put it on and buttoned tightly around the wrist. Cuffs on sleeves that end above the elbow are usually wide enough to fit over the hand and won’t need a ...

Boned bodice (Simplicity 4931)

How to Sew Boning Into A Bodice

Boning is a narrow strip of plastic or metal sewn into seams or casings used to build structure and support into garments. It’s called boning because years ago bones were used in place of plastic or metal. It’s most commonly sold by the yard as hard plastic in a soft feltlike fabric casing or as thin flat plastic boning that you can sew through without a fabric casing. Metal boning is harder to find and may have to be ordered from specialty websites. Metal boning, also called spiral-steel boning...

How to sew an abutted seam (4)

How to sew an Abutted Seam

An abutted seam is a flat seam used to join two layers of fabric without overlapping them. Instead the two layers are butted close to each other, without either layer going on top of the other. There is no seam allowance in an abutted seam; the two pieces touch along the seam line without overlapping and are sewn together with a zigzag stitch or other type of wide stitch. Seam binding or stay tape can be used to bridge the gap and strengthen the seam at the same time. ...